May 312018
 

The discount rate is used to calculate how much the expected future income from an investment over a given period of time is worth right now (the net present value), which can help you decide what you should pay for it. The rate used is usually based on the risk-free rate – the annual return you could expect to get on your money if you put it in the bank, or into a safe investment, such as UK government bonds over the same period. For example. if you are using a 5% discount rate, then £105 in a year’s time is worth the same as £100 today. The riskier the investment, the higher the discount rate you should apply – after all, you expect to get higher return from a risky investment than for putting your money in the bank.

Join our mailing list or RSS feed for more advice on the meaning of banking terms Discount rate. And why not leave a comment below?

Context

Do you have an example of where Discount rate can be used in context. Help me develop the site by leaving an example below. Every example using ‘Discount rate’ gets you another entry into the draw for 100 GBP of Amazon vouchers.

A winner will be selected on [date].

 Leave a Reply

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

(required)

(required)